J. C. Maxwell’s, ‘Dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field’

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                                Electric Elasticity 

(66) When an electromotive force acts on a dielectric, it 
puts every part of the dielectric into a polarized condition 
in which <s>even<\s> its opposite sides are oppositely electrified 

The amount of this electrification depends on the electromotive 
force and on the nature of the substance, and, in solids having 
a structure defined by axes, on the direction of the electromotive 
force with respect to these axes. In isotropic substances 
if k is the ratio of the electromotive force to the electric displacement 
we may write the 

Equations of Electric Elsaticity 

P = +kf 
Q = +kg 
R = +kh (E) 

Electric Resistance 

(67) When an electromotive force acts on a conductor it 
produces a current of electricity through it. This effect is 
additional to the electric displacement already considered. 
In solids of complex structure the relation between the electromotive 
force and the current depends on their direction through the 
solid. In isotropic substances, which alone we shall here 
consider, if [rho] is the specific resistance referred to unit 
of volume, we may write the 

Equations of Electric Resistance 

P = -[rho]p 
Q = -[rho]g 
R = -[rho]r (F) 

 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
James Clerk Maxwell
Reference
PT/72/7
Series
PT
Date
1864
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Cite as

J. C. Maxwell’s, ‘Dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field’, 1864. From The Royal Society, PT/72/7

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