On the Structure and Development of the Cysticercus cellulosae, as Found in the Pig, by George Rainey

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                                diluted muriatic acid, but which leave 
a residue of animal matter after all the 
carbonate has been dissolved. These bodies 
begin to be formed as soon as the neck ap
pears & continue to increase in number 
as it increases in size.
The probable office of bodies so purely 
mechanical, both in their form & com
position is most likely one which is 
purely mechanical also. Perhaps by 
giving a degree of solidity to the neck 
they enable the circular, & longitudinal 
fibres entering into its composition, to 
effect its protrusion from the ventral ca
vity, & thus serve as an example of a 
very low type of an internal skeleton. 
The terminal surface of the 
neck is of a quadrangular form, 
each angle being occupied by a circu
lar disc or sucker, & its centre contains 
an apparatus of hooklets, (see Plate 1. 
fig: 2) & thus the four suckers & hook
lets are all situated nearly upon the 
same planes, a position which would 
be advantageous for the employment 
of these organs when these animals 
are transferred from their deeply-seated 
& confined position between the muscular 
fibres to the free surface of the mucous 
membranes. The suckers are of a circular 
figure with a diameter of about 1/750 
of an inch. See Plate 1. fig: 4. Each 
consists of two or three membranous folds 
placed at different depths from the 
surface 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
George Rainey
Reference
PT/56/8
Series
PT
Date
1857
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On the Structure and Development of the Cysticercus cellulosae, as Found in the Pig, by George Rainey, 1857. From The Royal Society, PT/56/8

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