Account of pendulum experiments undertaken in the Harton Colliery, for the purpose of determining the mean density of the earth, by G. B. Airy

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                                small irregularities + or - affecting the ratio or multiplier
of each, the sum of all the components will be sensibly
free from the effects of those irregularities.

53. In like manner, if we divide the nucleus
by planes parallel to the tangent at I or U as shown by the dotted lines in Fig 2, (or indeed
in any other way) the attraction of the slices formed
are additive, both in their effect on I and in their effect
on U. Therefore, for the <s>[?]</s> nucleus generally, by the same
reasoning as that above, the effect of irregularities in the
outline (and therefore the effect of the irregularities in
the outline of the earth, on which these depend) will
be, as I conceive, sensibly evanescent. But this
does not apply to irregularities in the geological
constitution of the earth at a small distance below I:
because the irregularities, or rather that one irregularity,
may be <s>[?]</s> sensible in proportion to the whole change of attraction
between U and I. This is a source of uncertainty
from which no experiments made on the earth itself
can be perfectly free. We must treat in a great
measure to the general regularity of stratification <s>,</s>
of the district, for supporting us in the confidence that
there is no great disturbance in the law of attraction
of the nucleus upon the points U and I.
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
George Biddell Airy
Reference
PT/54/5
Series
PT
Date
1855
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Account of pendulum experiments undertaken in the Harton Colliery, for the purpose of determining the mean density of the earth, by G. B. Airy, 1855. From The Royal Society, PT/54/5

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