Account of pendulum experiments undertaken in the Harton Colliery, for the purpose of determining the mean density of the earth, by G. B. Airy

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                                10. Assisted by the introductions of <s>Dr.</s> David Lietch
Esq. MD. and by the local knowledge of James Mather
Esq, I had little difficulty <s>of</s> in fixing on a
mine. The deepest mines in the Durham coalfield
are near the coast. The deepest of all is the
Monk Wearmouth colliery; but it is to close to
the sea (its workings in fact extending far under
the sea) that it seemed probable that <s>[?]</s> more of
disadvantage would be introduced by the
complication of the elements of final computations
than of advantage by its extreme depth. The
next in depth, I believe, is the Harton Pit,
at the distance of somewhat more than two miles
from South Shields, and about the same
distance from the coast. The general circumstances
of form of surface &c are as favourable as can usually
be found. Its depth is reputed to be 1260 feet. On making known to William Anderson
Esq. the principal owner of the coalmine, my wish
to try the experiment in that <s>mine</s> place, I was at once
assured that every assistance should be given to me.
In company with C.W. Anderson Esq. and with G.W. Arkley Esq.
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
George Biddell Airy
Reference
PT/54/5
Series
PT
Date
1855
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Account of pendulum experiments undertaken in the Harton Colliery, for the purpose of determining the mean density of the earth, by G. B. Airy, 1855. From The Royal Society, PT/54/5

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