Account of pendulum experiments undertaken in the Harton Colliery, for the purpose of determining the mean density of the earth, by G. B. Airy

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                                The importance of a <s>[?]</s> firm foundation was perfectly
understood by the able practical men by whom the
ground-work was arranged, and particularly by Mr.
Arkley; and I conceive all was done which it
was possible to do, to make the floors <s>firm</s> solid. The
form of the iron stands <s>are</s> is particularly well adapted to firmness.
Any tendency to lateral or other movement is <s>[?]</s> counteracted
by the endwise resistance of strong straight iron bars.
I had at first intended to interchange the iron
stands in the middle of the operation: but upon
contemplating the mechanical firmness insured by
the plan of their construction, and the exact
similarity of the two stands in every respect,
I gave up this design; being fully convinced
that there <s>[?]</s> might be risk of instability in
a change, <s>and</s> but that there could scarcely be
any sensible absolute instability and (as I believe) <s>[?]</s>
no sensible relative instability, in the stands as
they were planted. The stands were <s>[?]</s> supported in
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
George Biddell Airy
Reference
PT/54/5
Series
PT
Date
1855
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Account of pendulum experiments undertaken in the Harton Colliery, for the purpose of determining the mean density of the earth, by G. B. Airy, 1855. From The Royal Society, PT/54/5

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