Letter from Henry Brougham (later Baron Brougham and Vaux), Edinburgh to Charles Blagden, Royal Society, Somerset Place, London

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                                I cannot deny <u>the difficulty of the subject <\u>, but I at the same 
time think, this no objection against an humble attempt 
at handling it - Nor do I deny that I have introduced much 
Mathematical demonstration; but then it must be re 
membered that the subject is partly mathematical -
However, if the Society or yourself, should think proper 
I have no objections to strike out all but the 
simple enunciation of the propositions- As to the 
experimental reasoning, I shall do my endeavour to make 
it more concise, if that can be done without predju 
dice to the perspicuity; and the numerous imper 
fections in style, arrangement &c &c, I have no 
doubt <s>your <\s> liberality of sentiment, will lead you 
and others to pardon in an author of the - I have only 
to add that the paper was drawn up, under the 
discouraging idea, of a taste for the Newtonian 
Philosophy having now given way (in it’s <u>turn <\u>) to the 
wonderful discoveries of Modern Chemistry; and this 
                            
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Manuscript details

Reference
CB/1/2/195
Series
CB
Date
1796
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Letter from Henry Brougham (later Baron Brougham and Vaux), Edinburgh to Charles Blagden, Royal Society, Somerset Place, London, 1796. From The Royal Society, CB/1/2/195

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