Description of Parts of a Human Skeleton from Pleistocene (Paleolithic) Bed, Tilbury, Essex

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seas from a great Europeo-Asiatic continent had not taken 
place - when the present Thames bore a larger stream 
of water into, probably, a <s>the <\s> greater continental river, now, perhaps, the Rhine -
all this has been amply proved by geological research, supplemented by the discovery of stone-
implements and weopens of the rude fabric which has 
suggested the term ‘palaeolithic’ for both the tools and the 
men who made them.
Par) The latest and most abundant evidence in support of 
this proposition, to my knowledge, has been <s>adduced <\s> given by Worthington G. Smith,
Esq, M.L.S., in the ‘Transactions of the Essex Field Club ‘ 1/
This evidence is mainly <s>adduced <\s> derived from formations on the 
West Bank of the Lea Valley; but the Author adds the 
localities of Barking, East Ham, Ilford, Grays Thurrock,
Tilbury, Mucking, Orsett & South-end. From all these it 
appears that Mr. Smith has “found the stone-tools <u>in situ <\u>‘. 2/
Par) <s>He makes no special <\s> In reference to the Tilbury find I 
have begged the attention of both my kind contributors of the bones to any 
flint tools or chips which may be come upon during the present 
excavations. Mr. Smith gives valuable and instructive 
evidence of other localities in ‘Cuts of the Sections ‘ in the 
Lea valley. 3/ But no bodily evidence of the fabricators 
of the palaeolithic tools has rewarded the persevering series 
of his Researches. “Human bones and teet, he remarks 
, I have never been 
[1 l III, Part 7, June 1883, p. 102.
2/ No details of the ‘Tilbury-find ‘ are given.
[3 lo]c cit, Figs, 1 - 8./
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Richard Owen
Reference
AP/62/6
Series
AP
Date
1883
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Description of Parts of a Human Skeleton from Pleistocene (Paleolithic) Bed, Tilbury, Essex, 1883. From The Royal Society, AP/62/6

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