Physiological Anatomy of the Lungs

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                                is corrugated, in order to complete that branch 
of the subject which relates to the general structure of the lungs - 
The Rugae. 
These rugae mark out the direction of 
certain longitudinal fibres, which are placed 
immediately beneath the mucous membrane 
The rugae are obviously caused by the con=
=tractile property of the circular fibres, which 
embrace and surround the longitudinal ones. 
Longitudinal 
and circular fibres 
The rugae are only visible when the 
diameters of the Bronchial tubes have 
been diminished by the contraction of the 
circular fibres. When the whole lung has 
been kept distended for some days, by pumping 
salt and water or some other viscid liquid 
into the Bronchial tubes, the tendency of 
these tubes to contract in their diameters 
will be overcome, and the mucous surface 
will then present a smooth appearance free 
from any rugae.
Fibrous 
capsules 
The contractile fibres, both longitudinal 
and circular, are continuous with the fibrous 
tissue, which has already been described 
as an expansion of the outer coat of the 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
James Newton Heale
Reference
AP/43/4
Series
AP
Date
1860
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Physiological Anatomy of the Lungs, 1860. From The Royal Society, AP/43/4

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