Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                In this way I have copied very minute 
complicated & delicate engravings, crowded 
with figures of small size, which were rendered 
with great distinctness -
The effect of the copy, though of 
course unlike the original, (substituting as it 
does lights for shadows and vice versa) yet is 
often very pleasing & would I think suggest to artists 
useful ideas respecting light & shade -
It may be supposed that the engraving would 
be soiled or injured by being thus pressed against 
the prepared paper. There is not much danger 
of this, provided both are perfectly dry.
It may be well to mention however, that in case 
any stain should be perceived on the engraving 
it may be readily removed by a chemical application 
which does no injury whatever to the paper.
In copying engravings &c. by this method, 
the light & shadows are reversed: consequently the 
effect is wholly altered. But if the picture 
so obtained is first <u>preserved <\u> so as to bear 
sunshine, it may be afterwards itself employed 
as an object to be copied: & by means of this 
second process the lights & shadows are brought 
back to their original disposition. In this 
way
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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