Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                liable to err from the true outline, & a very 
small deviation causes a notable diminution in 
the resemblance. I believe this manual process 
cannot be compared with the truth & fidelity 
with which the portrait is given by means of 
solar light.
<u>Paintings on glass <\u>.
The shadow pictures which are formed by exposing 
paintings on glass to solar light, are very pleasing.
The glass itself, around the 
painting, should be blackened: such, for instance 
as are often employed for the magic lantern -
The paintings on the glass should have no
bright yellows or reds, for these stop the 
violet rays of light which are the only effective 
ones. The pictures thus formed resemble the 
productions of the Artist’s pencil more, perhaps,
than any of the others. Persons to whom 
I have shown them have generally mistaken them
for such, at the same time observing, that the 
<u>style <\u> was new to them, & must be one rather 
difficult to acquire.
It is in these pictures only, that 
as yet, I have observed indications of <u>colour <\u>. 
I have 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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