Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                lost the corresponding objects, so that I cannot here 
state the exact numbers.
Not only does this process save our time & 
trouble, but there are many objects, especially 
microscopic crystallisations, which alter so greatly 
in the course of 3 or 4 days (and it could hardly 
take any artist less to delineate them in all their details)
that they could never be drawn in the usual way.
I will now describe the <u>degree of sensitiveness <\u> 
which this paper possesses - premising that I am far 
from supposing that I have reached the limit of which 
this quality is capable. On the contrary, considering 
the few experiments which I have made, (few, that is,
in comparison with the numbers which it would be easy to 
imagine & propose) I think it most likely, that other 
methods may be found, by which substances may be prepared 
perhaps as much transcending in sensitiveness the one 
which I have employed, as that does the ordinary slate 
of the nitrate of silver -
But, to confine myself to what I have 
actually accomplished, in the preparation of a very 
sensitive paper.
When a sheet of this paper is brought 
towards a window, not one through which the sun 
shines, but looking in the opposite direction, it 
immediately 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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