Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                or facsimiles of M.S.S.
For this purpose the engraving is prepared upon 
the prepared paper, with its engraved side in 
contact with the latter. The pressure must be 
as uniform as possible, that the contact may 
be perfect: for, the least interval sensibly 
injures the result, by producing a kind of cloudiness 
in lieu of the sharp strokes of the original.
When placed in the sun, the solar light 
gradually traverses the paper, except in those places 
where it is prevented from doing so by the opaque 
lines of the engraving. It therefore of course makes 
an exact image or print of the design. This 
is one of the experiments which Davy & Wedgwood 
state that they tried, but failed, from want of 
sufficient sensibility in their paper.
The length of time requisite for effecting 
the copy depends on the thickness of the paper 
on which the engraving has been printed.
At first I thought that it would not be possible 
to succeed with thick papers: but I found on trial 
that the success of the method was by no means 
so limited. It is enough for the purpose, if the paper 
allows any of the solar light to pass.
When the paper is thick, I allow half an 
hour for the formation of a good copy.
In this 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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