Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                the objects of external nature  - although 
indeed they are much less illuminated.
Not having with me in the country a <u>camera obscura <\u>
of any considerable size, I constructed one out of a 
large box, the image being thrown upon one end of it 
by a good object glass fixed in the opposite end -
This apparatus being armed with a sensitive paper 
was taken out in a summer afternoon & placed 
about 100 yards from a building favourably 
illuminated by the sun. An hour or two afterwards 
I opened the box, & I found depicted upon the 
paper a very distinct representation of the 
building, with the exception of those parts of it 
which lay in the shade.
A little experience in this branch of the art 
showed me, that with smaller <u>camerae obscurae <\u>
the effect would be produced in a smaller time.
Accordingly I had several small boxes made,
in which I fixed lenses of shorter focus, & with 
these I obtained very perfect but extremely small 
pictures: such as without great stretch of imagination 
might be supposed to be the work of some 
Lilliputian artist. They require indeed 
examination with a lens, to discern all their 
minutiae.
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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