Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                to be so easily deceived; for that it was evidently 
no picture, but the piece of lace itself.
At the very commencement of my experiments upon 
this subject, when I saw how beautiful were the 
images which were thus produced by the action of 
light, I regretted the more that they were 
destined to have such a brief existence, & I 
resolved to attempt to find out if possible some 
method of preventing this, or retarding it as much 
as possible -
The following considerations led me to conceive 
the possibility of discovering a preservative process 
The nitrate of silver which has become black 
by the action of light, is no longer the same chemical 
substance that it was before. Consequently,
if a picture, produced by solar light, is subjected 
afterwards to any chemical process, the white 
& dark parts of it will be differently acted 
upon: & there is no evidence, that after this 
action has taken place, these white and dark 
parts will any longer be subject to a spontaneous 
change. Or, if they are so, still it does not 
follow that that change will <u>now <\u> tend 
to assimilate them to each other  -
In case 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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