Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                so much more sensitive, than in another.
The result of these experiments was the 
discovery of a mode of preparation vastly superior 
in sensibility to what I had originally employed:
& by means of this, all those effects which I had 
before only anticipated as theoretically possible 
were found to be capable of realization.
When a sheet of this, which I shall call 
“<u>Sensitive Paper <\u>” is placed in a dark chamber 
& the magnified image of some object thrown on it 
by the Solar Microscope; after the lapse of perhaps 
a quarter of an hour, the picture is found to be 
completed. I have not as yet used high magnifying 
powers, on account of the consequent enfeeblement 
of the light. Of course, with a more sensitive 
paper, greater magnifying power will become 
desirable -
On examining one of these pictures, which 
I made about 3 years & a half ago, I find,
by actual measurement of the picture and the 
object, that the latter is magnified 17 times 
in linear diameter, & in surface consequently 
289 times. I have others which I believe are 
considerably more magnified; but I have 
lost 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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