Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                In case of their remaining <u>dissimilar <\u>
the picture will remain visible, & therefore 
our object will be accomplished.
If it should be asserted that exposure to sunshine 
would <u>necessarily <\u> reduce the whole to one uniform 
tint, & destroy the picture, the <u>onus probandi <\u> 
evidently lies on those who make the assertion -
If we designate by the letter A the exposure to the 
solar light; and by B some indeterminate Chemical 
process, my argument was this:- Since it cannot 
be shown <u>a priori <\u> that the final result of the 
series of processes A.B.A. will be the same 
with that denoted by B.A. it will therefore 
be worth while to put the matter to the list of 
experiments: viz. by varying the process B until the 
right one be discovered: or until so many trials 
have been made as to preclude all reasonable 
hope of its existence.
My first trials were unsuccessful, as indeed 
I expected: but after some time I discovered a 
method which answers perfectly, and shortly 
afterwards, another.
On one of these more especially I have made 
numerous 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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