Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                immediately begins to discolour.
For this reason, if the paper is prepared by 
daylight, it must by no means be left uncovered, but 
as soon as finished be shut up in a drawer or cupboard 
& there left to dry: or else, dried at night by the 
warmth of a fire.
Before using this paper for the delineation of 
any object, I generally approach it for a little time 
towards the light, thus intentionally giving it a slight 
shade of colour, for the purpose of seeing that the 
<u>ground <\u> is <u>even <\u>. If it appears so, when thus tried 
to a small extent, it will generally be found 
to prove so in the final result. But if there are 
some places or spots in it which do not acquire 
the same tint as the rest, such a sheet 
of paper should be rejected: for there is a risk 
that when employed - instead of presenting a <u>ground <…u>
uniformly dark, which is essential to the beauty 
of the drawing, it will have large white spots,
- places altogether insensitive to the effect of light.
This singular circumstance I shall revert to 
elsewhere: it is sufficient to mention it here.
The paper then, which is thus readily sensitive 
to the light of a common window, is of course much 
more so 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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