Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                The light, acting on the rest of the paper 
would naturally blacken it, while the parts 
in shadow would retain their whiteness.
Thus I expected that a kind of image or picture 
would be produced, resembling to a certain degree 
the object from which it was derived.
I expected however also, that it would 
be necessary to preserve such images in a portfolio,
& to view them only by candlelight : because,
if by daylight, the same natural process 
which formed the images, would destroy them, by 
blackening the rest of the paper.
Such was my leading idea, before 
it was enlarged & corrected by experience.
It was not until some time after,
& when I was in possession of several novel 
& curious results, that I thought of enquiring 
whether this process had been ever proposed 
or attempted before?
I found that in fact it had: but 
apparently not followed up to any extent, or 
with much perseverance. The few notices that 
I have been able to meet with, are vague & 
unsatisfactory; merely stating that such a 
method 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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