Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

View transcription
                                very strong light, as they would be liable to 
change thereby even years after their original 
formation. This very quality however admits 
of useful application. For, this semi-durable 
paper, which retains its whiteness for years in the 
shade, & yet suffers a change whenever exposed 
to the solar light, is evidently well suited 
to the use of a naturalist travelling in a 
distant country, who may wish to keep some 
memorial of the plants he finds, without having 
the trouble of drying them & carrying them 
about with him. He would only have to take 
a sheet of this paper, throw the image upon 
it & replace it in his portfolio.
The defect of this particular paper is,
that in general the <u>ground <\u> is not even; but 
this is of no consequence where utility alone 
& not beauty of effect, is consulted.
<u>Portraits <\u>
Another purpose for which I think my method 
will be found very convenient is the making 
of outline portraits, or <u>silhouettes <\u>. These 
are now often traced by the hand, from shadows 
projected by a candle. But the hand is 
liable 
                            
Please login to transcribe

Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
IIIF
Open IIIF manifest
(What's this?)
This is a link to the IIIF web URL for this item. You can drag and drop the IIIF image link into other compatible viewers

Cite as

Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

Copy

Comments

Please login to comment