Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                so that the images shall possess a character 
of durability, provided they are kept from 
the action of direct sunshine. These ways 
have presented themselves to notice rather accidentally 
than otherwise: in some instances without any 
particular memoranda having been made at the time,
so that I am not yet prepared to state accurately, on 
what particular thing this sort of semi-durability 
depends, or what course is best to be followed in 
order to obtain it. But as I have found that 
certain of the images which have been subjected to no
preserving process, remain quite white & perfect 
after the lapse of a year or two, & indeed show 
no symptom whatever of changing: while others 
differently prepared (& left unpreserved) have 
grown quite dark in one tenth of that time - I 
think this singularity requires to be pointed out.
Whether it will be of much value I do not know:
perhaps it will be thought better to incur at first 
the small additional trouble of employing the preserving 
process, especially as the drawings thus prepared 
will stand the sunshine; while the unpreserved 
ones, however well they last in a portfolio or in 
common daylight, should not be risked in a 
very 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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