Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

View transcription
                                the shade, but in this case the exposure 
should be only for a few minutes.
No attempts that have been made to prevent 
the uncoloured parts from being acted upon 
by light, have as yet been successful. They 
have been covered with a thin coating of fine 
varnish; but this has not destroyed their 
susceptibility of becoming coloured.
When the solar rays are passed through a print 
& thrown upon prepared paper, the unshaded 
parts are slowly copied: but the lights 
transmitted by the shaded parts, are seldom so 
definite as to form a distinct resemblance 
of them, by producing different intensities of 
colour.
The images formed by means of a <u>camera 
obscura <\u> have been found to be too faint to 
produce, in any moderate time, an effect upon 
the nitrate of silver. To copy these images 
was the first object of Mr Wedgwood, but 
all his numerous experiments proved unsuccessful.”
These are the observations of Sir Humphrey Davy.
I have been 
                            
Please login to transcribe

Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
IIIF
Open IIIF manifest
(What's this?)
This is a link to the IIIF web URL for this item. You can drag and drop the IIIF image link into other compatible viewers

Cite as

Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

Copy

Comments

Please login to comment