Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                the exception of a dark shade of it, approaching 
to black.
The blue-coloured variety has a very
pleasing effect, somewhat like that produced 
by the Wedgwood-ware which has white figures 
on a blue ground - This variety also retains 
its colours perfectly if preserved in a portfolio,
& not being subject to any spontaneous change 
requires no preserving process.
These different shades of colour are of course 
so many different chemical compounds which 
chemists have not hitherto distinctly noticed.
3.
<u>First applications of the process <\u>
The first kind of objects which I attempted to copy 
by this process, were flowers & leaves, either 
fresh or selected from my herbarium -
These it renders with the utmost truth 
& fidelity - exhibiting even the venation 
of the leaves, the minute hairs that clothe 
the plant, &c. &c.
It is so natural to associate the 
idea of <u>labour <\u> with great complexity 
and 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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