Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                which the Solar Microscope produces, the thought 
struck me whether it might not be possible 
to cause that image to impress itself upon the 
paper, & thus to let Nature substitute her own 
inimitable pencil, for the imperfect tedious & 
almost hopeless attempt of copying a subject so 
intricate?
My first attempt had no success. Although 
I chose a bright day, & formed a good image of my 
object, upon prepared paper; on returning at the 
expiration of an hour I found that no effect had 
taken place - I was therefore half inclined to abandon 
this experiment, when it occurred to me, that there 
was no reason to suppose that the common muriate 
of silver was the most sensitive substance that 
exists, to the action of the Chemical Rays: - and 
though such should eventually prove to be the fact,
at any rate it was not to be assumed without proof.
I therefore began a course of experiments in order 
to ascertain the influence of various modes of preparation,
& I found them to be signally different in their 
results. I considered this matter chiefly in a 
practical point of view, for as to the theory, I 
confess that cannot as yet understand the reason 
why the paper prepared in one way should be 
so much 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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