Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS

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                                and elaborate detail of execution; that one is 
more struck, at seeing the thousand florets of 
an <u>Agrostis <\u> depicted with all its capillary 
branchlets - (and so accurately, that none of all this 
multitude shall want its little bivalve calyx 
requiring to be examined through a lens) - than 
one is by the picture of the large and simple 
leaf of an oak or a chesnut. But in
truth the difficulty in both cases the same.
The one of these takes no more time to execute 
than the other: for, the object which would 
take the most skilful artist days or weeks 
of labour to trace or to copy, is effected 
by the boundless powers of natural chemistry 
in the space of a few seconds -
To give an idea of the degree of accuracy 
with which some objects can be imitated by this process,
I need only mention one instance.
Upon one occasion, having made an 
image of a piece of lace of an elaborate 
pattern, I showed it to some persons, at the 
distance of a few feet, with the enquiry:
Whether it was a good representation?
When the reply was: “that they were not 
to be 
                            
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Manuscript details

Author
Henry Fox Talbot
Reference
AP/23/19
Series
AP
Date
1839
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Some account of Photogenic Drawing or, the process of which Natural Objects may be made to delineate themselves, without the aid of the Artist's Pencil by Henry Fox Talbot Esq. FRS, 1839. From The Royal Society, AP/23/19

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