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Paper, 'Note on the reversal of hydrogen lines; and on the outburst of hydrogen lines when water is dropped into the arc' by [George Downing] Liveing and [James] Dewar

Reference number: PP/3/11

Date: 1883

Description

Liveing and Dewar write: 'The concentration of the radiation of hydrogen in a small number of spectral lines would lead us to expect that the absorption of light of the same refrangibility as those lines would, at the temperature of incandescence, be correspondingly strong, and that therefore the hydrogen lines would be easily reversed. The mass of hydrogen which we can raise to a temperature high enough to show the lines is, however, so small, that notwithstanding the great absorptive power of hydrogen for the rays which it emits, the reversal of the lines has not hitherto been noticed. We find, in fact, that the lines are very readily reversed, and the reversal may be easily observed. When a short induction spark is taken between electrodes of aluminium or magnesium in hydrogen at atmospheric pressure, a large Leyden jar being connected with the secondary wire of the coil, the hydrogen lines show no reversal; but if the pressure of the hydrogen be increased by half an atmosphere or even less, the lines expand and a fine dark line may be seen in the middle of the F line. As the pressure is increased this dark line becomes stronger, so that at two atmospheres it is very decided. As the F line expands with increase of pressure the dark line expands too and becomes a band. It is best seen when the pressure is between two and three atmospheres. When the pressure is further increased the dark band becomes diffuse, and at five atmospheres cannot be distinctly traced. No definite reversal of the C line was observed under these circumstances. The dispersion used, however, was only that of one prism.'

Annotations in pencil and ink. Includes one diagram of experimental observations.

Subject: Physics

Received 1 March 1883. Read 8 March 1883.

A version of this paper was published in volume 35 of the Proceedings of the Royal Society as 'Note on the reversal of hydrogen lines; and on the outburst of hydrogen lines when water is dropped into the arc'.

Reference number
PP/3/11
Earliest possible date
1883
Physical description
Ink and graphite pencil on paper
Page extent
5 pages
Format
Manuscript
Diagram

Creator names

George Downing Liveing

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James Dewar

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Citation

George Downing Liveing, James Dewar, Paper, 'Note on the reversal of hydrogen lines; and on the outburst of hydrogen lines when water is dropped into the arc' by [George Downing] Liveing and [James] Dewar, 1883, PP/3/11, The Royal Society Archives, London, https://makingscience.royalsociety.org/items/pp_3_11/paper-note-on-the-reversal-of-hydrogen-lines-and-on-the-outburst-of-hydrogen-lines-when-water-is-dropped-into-the-arc-by-george-downing-liveing-and-james-dewar, accessed on 21 February 2024

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  • Proceedings Papers

    Dates: 1882 - 1894

    The archival collection known as 'Proceedings Papers' is comprised of manuscripts and occasional proofs of scientific papers sent to the Royal Society which were read before meetings of Fellows and printed in full in the Proceedings of the Royal Society.

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